The Logo Development Process: New England Breeze Case Study

If you’ve never worked with a professional graphic designer, you may have no idea what goes into designing a logo. Even if you have worked with a designer, you’re probably curious about what goes on behind the scenes of developing a high-quality logo for a small business owner. Below is an outline of the typical process that we take at Visible Logic for the design and development of a logo. We’ll be using New England Breeze, LLC as our case study. Project Summary Create a logo for a new business—New England Breeze. The company sells and installs wind turbines and solar panels for business and residential customers. The owner wanted to make sure both energy sources —solar and wind—were obvious in the logo, especially because the name of the business only suggested wind. The logo should be one-color so that it is easily applicable on a variety of items and economical to print. The target market is individuals interested in […]

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Information Sells: Give Customers Enough to Complete the Sale

This weekend I spent time at what may become one of my favorite spots in Maine. It was an apple orchard + bakery + home-roasted espresso bar. Those are three of my favorite things in life. However, their lack of information in the bakery nearly made me overlook several items. The more I knew, the more I wanted to buy. The bakery case was filled with different goodies. I knew from reading their web site that they were supposed to have many items that featured their own, organic apples. So I wanted to choose one of those. But nothing was labeled. So, I started asking: “What is that?”, “What is that?”, “What is that?” as I pointed to anything looking apple-y looking. My first two guesses were incorrect, and as I sensed the line growing behind me, I was feeling some pressure to make a decision. I knew the donuts were cider donuts (they had been advertised on the web […]

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Branding on the Social Web

I spent Tuesday at The Big Conference here in Portland, Maine. The main theme was using social media, social networking, social web—or whatever you want to call it—to build your business. As a graphic designer, I work to build brand identities and branding systems: The visual identification of a company and its brand. And this topic was mostly absent from the day’s lectures. But in fact, branding and social media are very entwined. Fewer places to build brand identity In the channels of social media, many of the typical “look and feel” touch points cannot be used. Your friends and followers may be receiving your updates as text messages, or within the pre-branded space of something like Facebook. In fact, the branding space of Twitter is the reverse of traditional brand identity. If your follower logs onto twitter.com to get their updates, they are reading your messages in their own personally branded environment. The only time they see your branded […]

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Blog Action Day: Climate Change from the Designer, Business Owner and Human Perspective

Today is Blog Action Day, an annual event every October 15th that unites the world’s bloggers in posting about the same issue on the same day with the aim of sparking discussion around an issue of global importance. This year’s theme is Climate Change. I’d like to take this opportunity to speak as a designer, a business owner, and finally just as a human to express about how the threat of climate change affects me, and what I think we all could be doing better. As a designer: don’t produce so much stuff I make my money off designing things. Some of these things have more environmental impact than others. A book for example, involves a lot of paper, a lot of (sometimes very environmentally unhealthy) ink, a manufacturing processes that requires a lot of energy, and then shipping this heavy object around to its end user. But, people like books, people want books and people buy books. I don’t […]

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Proofreading: Tools for Working Efficiently with Your Graphic Designer

Editing and correcting text is part of nearly every job that we do here at Visible Logic. Even on a web site design project that includes a Content Management System there is still text that is set by us, and then reviewed and edited by our clients. With print projects such as interior book layouts, print advertisements or brochures typographic edits can be extensive. The purpose of this post is to help make this process go as smoothly and quickly as possible, whether you’re working with Visible Logic, or with any designer. The process The general working process we follow is to: receive content from the client; typeset the words into the layout; send the proof to the client for review; receive edits; make the corrections. The more clearly we receive the edits back from the client, the more smoothly and quickly the project completes. Here are some tips to help with the proofreading / correction process. Use traditional proofreading […]

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