Proofreading: Tools for Working Efficiently with Your Graphic Designer

Editing and correcting text is part of nearly every job that we do here at Visible Logic. Even on a web site design project that includes a Content Management System there is still text that is set by us, and then reviewed and edited by our clients. With print projects such as interior book layouts, print advertisements or brochures typographic edits can be extensive. The purpose of this post is to help make this process go as smoothly and quickly as possible, whether you’re working with Visible Logic, or with any designer. The process The general working process we follow is to: receive content from the client; typeset the words into the layout; send the proof to the client for review; receive edits; make the corrections. The more clearly we receive the edits back from the client, the more smoothly and quickly the project completes. Here are some tips to help with the proofreading / correction process. Use traditional proofreading […]

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Type Size Explained

It’s a bit of a stereotype, but designers have a reputation for setting type too small and clients have a habit of asking for it larger. When setting type for print projects, there are a number of issues to consider: Application: Across the room or held in your hand? An ad, a poster at a trade show, or a book cover all need to have typography large enough to attract a browser’s eye. A brochure that is held at arms’ length relies on larger headlines to get key points across and then smaller type to fill in details. A business card should have the business and individual name easy to read, but other contact details can be smaller as it will accessed only when the reader is focused on getting that information. Context: Attracting attention or a captive audience? Another factor is how focused is the reader’s attention? While a novel and a sales brochure may both be held at […]

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Are Branding and SEO at Odds?

Several items have crossed my virtual desktop recently that had me wondering: “When did branding and SEO become opposing goals for a web site redesign?” For example, I recently read Hub Spot’s materials on Web site redesigns. I also listened to a podcast by SEO Rockstars called Branding versus SEO on Corporate Websites which used the Target web site as a case study. Both of these presentations seem to suggest that branding and SEO (Search Engine Optimization) were at odds with one another, and that SEO should be of primary importance. Let’s start with what we all agree on: You should build a web site so that search engines can easily find you. This means use of key words in content, titles and tags. Key content should be searchable. Which means it should not be embedded in graphic files or within a flash presentation. Content matters. You need to have lots of fresh and inviting content. Don’t redesign without good […]

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Creativity and Pricing

The creative process can be a challenge to control, and therefore tricky to price. One of the best and worst things about being a graphic designer is that the work is creative, but also functional. It has a distinct commercial application as the end result. Whether it’s to promote a service, educate someone or explain how something works, graphic design is ultimately a commercial endeavor. Therefore, someone cares about how much it costs. I read a great quote on a fairly new blog called Group Thinkery. In a comment, book designer Christopher Tobias stated: I try to give every client 100%. No matter what the budget. Those who are willing to think and work and are open to creative ideas end up with the best product. Project variability I couldn’t agree more. It can be difficult to price graphic design services. It is a combination of how long something will take and also value of the end product. What I […]

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