Email Marketing Proven to Build Loyalty

A recent study shows that permission-based email campaigns overwhelmingly have a positive influence on consumer behavior. The study of 1517 consumers, completed by marketing agency Epsilon, showed that 57% of consumers feel they have a more positive impression of companies when they receive email from them. In addition, email builds consumer loyalty, increases purchasing both on- and off-line, and generates a positive impression of the sending company. Highlights of the study This study was focused on businesses in Financial Services, Retail, Consumer Packaged Goods, and Pharmaceuticals/Healthcare, but the statistics are so overwhelming there should be a takeaway for all businesses. Also, the study was not just focused on open and click-through rates, it was looking to shed light on brand building. Some things that really jumped out at me: 57% of respondents said they remembered a company when making a purchase online, even when they didn’t use the email link itself to make the purchase. 50% said they’re more likely… Continue Reading »

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Starting a Blog: Tips Based on 60 Days of Blogging

It has been an interesting journey starting this blog. I actually have previously helped a few of my client’s with their own blogs, but this is a first for me personally. I thought I’d share my thoughts and tips now that I am at day 60 of running the blog. Start with a soft launch A soft launch means that you are using the blog tools and adding content, but you’re not screaming for attention yet. If you choose to use WordPress you can even turn off the ability for Google and other search engines to find you. (If you do this, make sure you remember to turn it back on later!) By adding content before you officially go live, you will have a few articles and entries to interest readers when they do arrive. For Visible Logic’s blog, I created posts before adding the link to the blog into the navigation of the site. That means the blog was… Continue Reading »

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Good Design vs. Good Branding: Tropicana Case Study

You’ve probably heard by now that Tropicana redesigned their orange juice cartons, but then received so much negative feedback they’ve decided to revert to their old design. This is an example of how design in a vacuum can lead to terrible branding decisions. The design changes For years, Tropicana used their image of the straw in the orange to suggest a fresh-from-the-orchard taste. That image was backed up by a package design that had a sense of old-time farm stand signage while still being clean and modern looking. On the other hand, their new design shows orange juice poured into a wine glass sort of goblet. The placement of the glass is off-center in a way that abstracts the image. The typography changed from featuring the brand name top & center, to rotating it 90-degrees. The remaining type is sans serif and set in a modern and minimalist way. Personally I favor the old version because the colors are richer,… Continue Reading »

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Micro Firms and Start-Ups Essential to Economy

I found some interesting data that finally supports what many of us have been thinking: that solopreneurs and very small businesses are accounting for much of the job creation in the U.S. According to new data from the Kauffman Foundation and the US Census Bureau, as highlighted in Inc. Magazine, firms with one to four employees have accounted for an average of 20 percent of new jobs each year from 1980-2005. During that time, start-ups accounted for 3% of total employment. While that doesn’t seem like much, the average annual net employment growth over the same period was 1.8 percent, meaning that job creation would be contracting during those 25 years rather than expanding without these micro firms. Over the timeframe of the study, it was found that “while startups do tend to decline slightly during downturns, they remained fairly robust in even the most severe of the sample period’s recessions.” And according to Robert E. Litan, vice president of… Continue Reading »

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The Power of Color in Branding

Most companies have a “corporate color” or color palette. This is generally the color or colors used in the logo. The designer usually picks a Pantone (PMS) color, and also selects CMYK and RGB equivalents. But why stop with just a splash of color on your logo? Consider using more color to create an impact beyond the logo. A classic example: Tiffany & Co Blue Box Tiffany & Co introduced their signature blue box in 1837, the year they opened. While their logotype is elegant and well-design, it is their blue color that is far more memorable and eye-catching. Looking at the photo here, most Americans would know it’s a box from Tiffany’s even without seeing the name. What makes it effective? Consistency, first of all. They’ve been using the same branding scheme for over 170 years. Distinctiveness is second. It’s a very unique color of blue. Not your basic royal or sky blue, but a robin’s egg, sort of… Continue Reading »

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